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Solon, Ohio #9 on Smarttravel.tips

July 25, 2016 as posted on Facebook

Solon, Ohio is located in the northeastern portion of the state and is a mutual suburb of Cleveland, Akron, and Canton. Solon ranked 3rd in 2011 as one of the nation’s best places to live via Money and is often considered one of the safest cities in Ohio according to the public school system. In 2013 the city’s economic strength was recognized by Google with an eCity award for its thriving online business activity. That strength is proven in the city’s educational statistics from 2010, which stated that over 57% of residents over the age of 25 years old possessed a college degree while the median age of Solon residents was at only 43 years old. Due to its economic success, Solon is often referred to as a satellite city with its job industry being solid enough to promote and back its residents. Major corporations with offices in Solon include Nestle, First Class Limos, Arrow Electronics, and Keithley Instruments— all of which are ranked in the city’s top ten employers. On top of financial and economic success, Solon has a lively arts community as well as a supportive local police department.

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Solon, Ohio #10 in Money Magazine’s Best Places to Live

by Vanessa Richardson on August 14, 2015 | posted in Money

AT A GLANCE
Population 24,472
Median Income $98,026
Job Growth 4.9%
Median Home Price $245,056
Property Tax $6,313

 

On a typical weekday morning, it seems that as many cars make the rush-hour drive into Solon as those doing the 30-minute commute to downtown Cleveland. Among the 800-plus local businesses are divisions of the Cleveland Clinic and Nestlé and the world headquarters of Swagelok, maker of components for gas and fluid systems. The chamber of commerce aims to lure more businesses with tax breaks and job-creation grants.

Both the city and schools are working to teach students skills that could land them a Money magazine 500pxjob at one of those local businesses. A Young Innovators Society inspires kids from kindergarten on up to get into STEM fields, and a “Minnow Tank” contest for junior entrepreneurs will make its debut in January.

That doesn’t mean Solon is all work, no play. The town, which already has a popular community ­orchestra, just launched a band, and there are plenty of parks, trails, and riverside green spaces where locals can go to kick back. –Vanessa Richardson

Best Cities for Young Families in Ohio

by on March 9, 2015 | posted in NerdWallet.com

 

Ohio may have been built on manufacturing and transportation, but towns like Solon are leading the way in the new digital economy. Google recognized Solon for each of the past two years as Ohio’s top online business community. By focusing on the emerging digital economy, Solon has been able to create better jobs for its residents. It is also one of the four cities in the top 10 with a perfect 10 rating at GreatSchools, and over half of residents older than 25 have at least a bachelor’s degree.

 


 

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The Buckeye State is not only a national leader in college football — Ohio State University’s six national poll-era championships put it at No. 5 among schools — and presidential political success — eight U.S. presidents lived in Ohio at the time of their election — but it’s also a top place for young families, too.

Football and politics aside, Ohio also has many of the qualities that make it an attractive place to settle down and raise children. The state is affordable, with a median home value of $123,700, which is 30% below the national average. Ohio also has exceptional schools, with over 1 in 5 cities statewide scoring at least 8 out of 10 at GreatSchools.

Even though manufacturing is still a significant part of Ohio’s economy — 15% of jobs are in manufacturing, which is 50% higher than the national average — the state is working to shed the Rust Belt label. Ohio is now home to 25 Fortune 500 companies that specialize in industries from consumer packaged goods to insurance. With these changes, employment opportunities have become more dynamic.

The unemployment rate of 4.8% in December 2014 was about a full point below the national average, providing proof that Ohio has come a long way since 2009, when the jobless rate peaked at 10.6%, which was higher than the national rate that year.

NerdWallet found the communities in Ohio that offer young families the best combination of solid schools, friendly neighbors and affordable housing. Here’s our second analysis of 184 cities, towns and census-designated places in Ohio.

Key takeaways

Options to big cities. The average population of the cities in our top 10 is 20,643, and no place is larger than Mason’s 30,905 residents. This means families will find the amenities they are looking for without having to live in a major metropolitan area.

It’s relatively expensive. The average median home value in the top 10 cities is $201,140, or about 60% higher than the statewide median home value of $123,700. But when compared with the national median of $176,700, homes in Ohio’s most expensive cities are still relatively affordable.

Schools are exceptional. The top 10 cities have an average GreatSchools ranking of 8.7 out of 10, so families can find a quality education in any corner of the state.

NerdWallet’s analysis

Home affordability. We looked at median home value and selected monthly homeowner costs to prioritize affordable communities.

Prosperity and growth. Looking at current and past family incomes, we calculated the income of residents, as well as the projected long-term growth of each city.

Quality of education. We looked at ratings at GreatSchools.org to find the best schools.

Family friendliness. This year, we added a new component to our methodology — the percentage of families with school-age children and the poverty rate for young children. This measure helps determine if an area is not only affordable for families, but if it is also a healthy one for children.

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NerdWallet crunched the data for 184 places in Ohio – cities, towns and census-designated places. Only places with over 10,000 residents were analyzed. To see the full data set, click here.

Best cities for young families in Ohio

1. Springboro

Springboro is a small town with a cosmopolitan flair. It has quick access to Cincinnati and Dayton, and more than half of residents 25 and older have at least a bachelor’s degree, which is double the state average. Yet Springboro maintains a community-oriented feeling. The annual Christmas in Historic Springboro Festival bills itself as the largest three-day holiday festival in Ohio, Kentucky or Indiana, and the Freedom Festival celebrates Springboro’s history as a stop on the Underground Railroad.

2. Pickerington

Youth is on the side of the Violet Capital of Ohio, a nickname adopted because of the wealth of violets in the area when it was first settled in the late 18th century. Pickerington has a population that is significantly younger than the rest of the state: 33% of residents are under age 18, a figure that is 10% higher than the statewide average. It is no surprise that 40% of households are married couples with children, which is the highest mark in the state. Aside from its family friendliness, residents enjoy affordable homes in Pickerington, with its median home value of $183,200, well below the top 10 average of $201,140.

3. Mason

Monte Carlo, Rome, Shanghai, Paris, Mason — those are a few of the nine stops for the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tennis tournament series. Mason is also home to the headquarters of Luxottica Retail and Cintas, and it has a sizable Procter & Gamble branch office. Its strong and diversified economy aside, Mason has a perfect 10 score from GreatSchools. Residents here can expect to allocate 21% of median family income to homeownership costs.

4. Hilliard

Hilliard may be only 18 miles outside Columbus, Ohio’s largest city, but this 30,000-resident town is committed to creating its own strong business and entertainment community. The small businesses in Old Hilliard, the town’s walkable, quaint center, showcase its economic success. The Hilliard Arts Council puts on a popular summer concert series and the annual Old Hilliardfest, the town’s premier event.

5. Solon

Ohio may have been built on manufacturing and transportation, but towns like Solon are leading the way in the new digital economy. Google recognized Solon for each of the past two years as Ohio’s top online business community. By focusing on the emerging digital economy, Solon has been able to create better jobs for its residents. It is also one of the four cities in the top 10 with a perfect 10 rating at GreatSchools, and over half of residents older than 25 have at least a bachelor’s degree.

6. Hudson

Hudson is something of an intellectual center in the North Coast. The town’s median home value of $289,900 is the highest in the top 10, but for that cost, residents get a school system with a perfect 10 from GreatSchools, and a community where more than two-thirds of residents 25 and older have at least a bachelor’s degree. Considering its educational profile, it is safe to say that the Learned Owl Book Shop in Downtown Hudson will continue to ring in sales among local young families.

7. Norton

Norton is all about its classic Midwest appeal, and young families seeking a slice of true Americana will love living in Norton. The median home value of $137,800 is the lowest in the top 10. Residents of Norton look forward to the Cider Festival, which, over the years, has grown from a small neighborhood event into the town’s most prominent annual celebration. For the golfers in the family, nearby Firestone Country Club is a stop on the PGA Tour and it has been regularly named one of the best courses in the country.

8. Wadsworth

Winston Churchill, whose surly remarks pierced even the heartiest of opponents, would have had no ill remarks for Wadsworth. This suburban Akron town was where Blue Tip Matches, the favorite of the most famous cigar smoker in history, were manufactured. The town’s biggest annual festival, the Blue Tip Festival, is in honor of its celebrated, but discontinued, matchsticks. Downtown Wadsworth is also home to an Easter egg hunt, the Summer Breeze concert series and the annual holiday parade.

9. Harrison

The complete renovation of downtown Harrison in 2000 led to a sort of renaissance for this small community 22 miles outside Cincinnati. Centralizing a district with local businesses, galleries and restaurants invigorated the town, and set the stage for over a decade of success. The increase in median family income of 68% since 1999 is the second-strongest rate of growth in the top 10, and the town’s population has increased 39% since 2000.

10. Rocky River

Rocky River is, by all measures, booming. Median family incomes have jumped 87% since 2000, far outpacing the top 10 average of 52%. Unsurprisingly, families are flocking to the Rocky River, as the number of family households with children has increased 12% since 2000 — the largest such gain in the top 10. Families are also drawn by the schools and cost of living: Of the four cities in the top 10 with a score of 10 from GreatSchools, Rocky River has the lowest median home value at $199,100.

Best cities for young families in Ohio

 Rank Location GreatSchools rank Median home value Family income growth
1999-2013
Median family income in 2013 Percent of families with at least
one child under 18
Young families score
1 Springboro 9 $201,900 46.09% $105,644 37.90% 67.08
2 Pickerington 8 $183,200 36.76% $87,068 39.50% 65.54
3 Mason 10 $221,500 62.99% $107,519 33.20% 65.30
4 Hilliard 8 $205,000 44.48% $99,713 34.40% 62.31
5 Solon 10 $266,300 38.54% $109,315 35.10% 61.66
6 Hudson 10 $289,900 32.81% $131,688 36.00% 61.57
7 Norton 8 $137,800 52.51% $71,810 22.00% 61.15
8 Wadsworth 8 $159,200 49.22% $72,526 25.60% 61.03
9 Harrison 6 $147,500 68.17% $77,538 29.50% 60.53
10 Rocky River 10 $199,100 87.17% $96,648 20.20% 60.21
11 Avon 8 $249,100 58.81% $106,003 34.10% 60.17
12 Perrysburg 8 $189,300 48.88% $92,656 26.20% 59.97
13 Monroe 8 $158,100 42.89% $80,037 25.30% 59.79
14 Twinsburg 9 $206,700 43.67% $88,556 26.70% 59.78
15 Lebanon 8 $159,200 46.38% $68,589 27.90% 59.30
16 Bay Village 8 $197,800 36.42% $96,035 26.70% 59.15
17 Trenton 5 $125,100 28.89% $65,645 30.60% 59.14
18 Sylvania 8 $171,800 55.69% $89,300 22.70% 58.89
19 Aurora 10 $247,600 36.58% $96,970 24.20% 58.06
20 Dublin 9 $330,900 49.14% $135,955 38.30% 57.82
21 Avon Lake 8 $213,300 49.75% $98,818 25.50% 57.64
22 North Canton 9 $137,300 52.00% $63,860 14.80% 57.57
23 Loveland 8 $167,300 80.56% $95,224 23.80% 57.52
24 University Heights 7 $159,100 40.63% $86,676 25.50% 57.47
25 Bexley 9 $274,600 62.83% $114,306 30.00% 57.37
26 Brecksville 10 $243,800 47.98% $112,703 23.10% 57.28
27 Macedonia 7 $187,900 31.20% $90,407 26.00% 57.11
28 Delaware 7 $158,500 54.07% $70,917 24.40% 56.71
29 Broadview Heights 9 $213,700 63.35% $93,094 22.10% 56.44
30 Beavercreek 8 $174,100 34.66% $92,646 22.30% 56.44
31 Vandalia 8 $137,700 51.61% $67,409 18.40% 56.43
32 Englewood 7 $120,200 32.01% $61,940 19.60% 56.37
33 Dover 7 $111,700 45.62% $53,391 15.60% 56.22
34 Brunswick 7 $157,400 29.38% $72,825 22.70% 55.95
35 Upper Arlington 10 $306,800 65.94% $119,669 26.80% 55.89
36 Gahanna 7 $186,300 34.15% $88,581 24.80% 55.86
37 Mentor 7 $169,000 40.02% $80,135 20.60% 55.28
38 Marysville 7 $159,500 53.09% $71,594 25.40% 55.03
39 Ironton 5 $87,300 96.71% $46,393 14.30% 54.97
40 Worthington 7 $239,100 61.48% $110,722 27.00% 54.85
41 Stow 7 $165,900 43.65% $82,632 23.10% 54.72
42 Van Wert 7 $82,100 48.35% $49,261 15.40% 54.63
43 Westerville 7 $204,900 43.84% $99,442 23.80% 54.54
44 Celina 7 $103,000 40.75% $50,750 17.50% 54.44
45 Centerville 8 $169,500 48.96% $81,766 15.70% 54.29
46 Wickliffe 6 $126,200 36.24% $59,263 17.10% 54.27
47 Kettering 8 $130,100 40.33% $63,222 14.90% 54.10
48 Ashland 7 $101,600 60.85% $55,092 18.50% 53.97
49 Green 7 $174,300 44.01% $77,958 24.20% 53.92
50 Westlake 8 $228,800 56.22% $101,482 21.40% 53.77
51 Urbana 6 $98,300 36.39% $45,967 17.90% 53.68
52 Medina 7 $161,700 39.79% $70,211 25.10% 53.65
53 Berea 6 $128,100 61.04% $73,593 16.50% 53.62
54 Beachwood 10 $280,800 69.49% $110,855 19.50% 53.56
55 Grove City 6 $160,100 48.40% $77,265 23.30% 53.47
56 Brook Park 6 $117,700 31.58% $60,964 15.50% 53.08
57 Massillon 7 $98,100 45.23% $47,538 15.40% 52.63
58 North Royalton 8 $193,700 48.20% $85,062 19.60% 52.58
59 Fairview Park 6 $144,600 42.46% $71,922 18.10% 52.43
60 Pataskala 6 $161,200 38.92% $71,800 22.70% 52.35
61 Miamisburg 6 $136,800 42.55% $68,873 19.20% 51.99
62 Parma 6 $115,700 37.09% $60,209 15.70% 51.98
63 Troy 7 $123,800 58.62% $62,705 15.00% 51.94
64 Amherst 7 $153,700 40.94% $75,425 22.00% 51.81
65 North Ridgeville 5 $161,900 44.70% $78,836 21.80% 51.75
66 Strongsville 6 $193,700 43.79% $98,728 24.60% 51.73
67 Mount Vernon 5 $102,600 60.69% $47,888 15.20% 51.54
68 Tiffin 6 $91,400 36.02% $45,240 16.50% 51.48
69 North Olmsted 6 $147,400 41.35% $74,269 18.00% 51.40
70 Galion 5 $71,100 26.42% $39,838 17.40% 51.35
71 New Philadelphia 6 $102,800 58.15% $52,560 17.90% 51.26
72 Cuyahoga Falls 6 $120,400 47.15% $62,190 16.40% 51.18
73 Franklin 5 $109,400 31.26% $50,064 18.80% 50.87
74 Middleburg Heights 6 $160,300 48.14% $70,948 15.30% 50.67
75 Clayton 6 $135,800 24.12% $75,250 22.20% 50.60
76 Oregon 4 $133,100 53.06% $70,065 20.30% 50.35
77 Coshocton 5 $87,000 39.28% $43,313 15.10% 50.34
78 Reynoldsburg 6 $145,200 36.89% $69,962 19.30% 50.29
79 Willoughby 6 $147,400 51.57% $65,760 15.50% 50.28
80 Fairfield 6 $147,100 30.93% $65,878 16.50% 50.21
81 Newark 6 $113,900 47.84% $51,435 16.50% 50.17
82 Lyndhurst 4 $143,900 51.63% $79,262 20.00% 50.00
83 Tallmadge 8 $155,200 38.01% $68,152 18.50% 49.78
84 Sidney 4 $105,200 33.37% $51,566 17.50% 49.75
85 Willowick 6 $121,000 34.86% $59,481 15.70% 49.70
86 Findlay 7 $123,300 48.54% $60,729 14.60% 49.67
87 Streetsboro 5 $149,500 47.46% $71,756 19.90% 49.58
88 South Euclid 4 $114,100 48.82% $71,949 15.30% 49.50
89 Eastlake 5 $128,000 43.53% $62,144 16.60% 49.49
90 Wooster 6 $123,100 61.92% $60,559 13.90% 49.08
91 Bowling Green 8 $159,900 111.70% $64,777 12.20% 48.96
92 Salem 4 $85,600 64.24% $49,283 16.30% 48.95
93 Maumee 4 $127,000 44.87% $69,201 19.80% 48.77
94 Parma Heights 5 $117,700 52.28% $56,320 17.30% 48.67
95 Seven Hills 6 $166,000 49.25% $81,214 15.50% 48.30
96 Huber Heights 4 $108,000 23.81% $60,755 19.20% 48.30
97 Struthers 5 $71,100 51.41% $46,514 13.80% 48.29
98 Athens 6 $162,300 294.23% $67,500 8.70% 48.17
99 Painesville 5 $110,500 42.10% $49,512 17.40% 48.15
100 Kent 6 $138,600 105.42% $60,766 12.90% 48.01
101 Hamilton 5 $104,300 36.81% $48,382 14.60% 47.80
102 Shaker Heights 6 $223,800 59.72% $102,193 23.50% 47.71
103 Fremont 5 $85,800 30.14% $44,315 16.90% 47.64
104 Bellefontaine 6 $100,500 26.77% $45,673 14.30% 47.25
105 Lakewood 6 $129,400 52.68% $61,877 12.80% 47.10
106 Defiance 6 $98,400 25.21% $52,176 14.20% 47.08
107 Lancaster 6 $115,900 44.59% $48,178 14.70% 47.07
108 Norwood 6 $121,900 46.33% $47,153 10.70% 46.97
109 Norwalk 4 $118,100 40.38% $53,033 17.40% 46.92
110 Steubenville 5 $93,300 70.32% $45,163 11.50% 46.86
111 Reading 6 $127,400 36.18% $53,301 11.50% 46.85
112 Lima 5 $70,500 29.80% $35,132 12.60% 46.67
113 Piqua 5 $87,400 17.50% $41,925 14.00% 46.49
114 Xenia 4 $98,400 37.50% $50,129 18.00% 46.39
115 Greenville 5 $87,000 32.74% $42,199 13.40% 46.25
116 Bucyrus 4 $80,700 35.44% $43,875 14.40% 46.22
117 Heath 5 $129,600 50.14% $60,238 17.00% 46.10
118 Oxford 7 $188,100 190.47% $73,093 8.40% 45.86
119 East Liverpool 4 $54,700 55.04% $35,872 14.20% 45.71
120 Sandusky 4 $85,000 45.21% $45,208 10.10% 45.50
121 Springfield 5 $82,100 31.30% $42,269 12.10% 45.22
122 Alliance 5 $81,200 31.39% $39,520 13.00% 44.76
123 Garfield Heights 3 $85,900 26.35% $49,627 15.00% 44.75
124 Bedford 4 $95,000 41.76% $52,372 11.70% 44.69
125 Circleville 5 $119,100 42.86% $49,389 14.20% 44.61
126 Mansfield 5 $79,900 36.24% $41,112 10.80% 44.47
127 Warren 5 $65,600 22.89% $37,047 10.60% 44.46
128 Cambridge 5 $84,300 48.16% $35,709 12.80% 44.44
129 Niles 4 $81,600 41.03% $50,229 12.30% 44.39
130 Conneaut 4 $87,200 40.36% $44,518 16.70% 44.39
131 Fostoria 4 $68,100 34.30% $41,855 13.50% 44.27
132 Barberton 4 $86,800 42.08% $45,717 13.80% 44.18
133 Elyria 4 $100,400 27.93% $48,813 13.30% 43.88
134 Canton 5 $77,200 28.16% $36,821 11.10% 43.81
135 Middletown 5 $97,200 25.79% $45,556 13.40% 43.80
136 Marion 4 $77,500 28.28% $42,492 14.00% 43.78
137 Euclid 4 $91,200 41.44% $49,717 9.90% 43.67
138 Fairborn 4 $109,100 48.80% $54,890 12.70% 43.59
139 Portsmouth 3 $74,200 85.70% $42,719 11.20% 43.54
140 Columbus 4 $130,700 42.55% $54,024 14.20% 42.87
141 Chillicothe 4 $97,800 35.85% $46,178 11.80% 42.71
142 Whitehall 4 $90,900 17.46% $38,520 11.00% 42.58
143 Brooklyn 5 $115,100 32.64% $47,813 13.70% 42.50
144 Ashtabula 4 $78,700 27.65% $34,918 13.20% 42.37
145 Youngstown 5 $46,600 30.75% $31,642 7.10% 42.28
146 Wilmington 5 $97,700 10.26% $38,458 15.50% 42.25
147 Toledo 4 $83,600 33.87% $43,568 11.80% 42.19
148 Marietta 4 $100,000 63.89% $47,974 9.90% 42.13
149 Vermilion 4 $130,300 21.22% $60,522 16.10% 41.89
150 Akron 4 $83,900 37.87% $43,892 10.90% 41.89
151 Zanesville 4 $76,200 24.68% $33,217 11.30% 40.95
152 Ravenna 4 $106,100 35.17% $48,188 12.90% 40.71
153 Lorain 4 $93,400 25.08% $42,425 12.90% 40.48
154 Cleveland Heights 3 $132,600 47.22% $68,798 13.20% 39.95
155 Maple Heights 3 $84,400 9.72% $44,342 9.30% 39.77
156 Dayton 4 $69,600 26.49% $34,686 8.70% 39.05
157 Cincinnati 5 $123,600 49.76% $44,170 8.60% 38.16
158 Warrensville Heights 2 $93,600 10.78% $41,213 7.10% 38.11
159 Richmond Heights 3 $155,400 61.38% $70,402 10.30% 38.06
160 East Cleveland 3 $68,900 30.64% $26,836 5.30% 35.62
161 Cleveland 3 $76,700 26.54% $32,808 7.40% 35.22
162 Trotwood 2 $81,300 21.02% $42,275 9.30% 34.14

This table doesn’t include 22 places that lacked complete school data or 1999 income data.

Methodology

All data are from the 2013 U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Our methodology focused on four factors:

  1. Home affordability. Home affordability, 30% of the total score, was calculated by averaging index scores for median home value and median selected monthly owner costs. The lower the costs, the higher the score.
  2. Growth and prosperity. Growth and prosperity are 20% of the total score. The two metrics involved were growth in family income from 1999 to 2013, and median family income in 2013. Both were weighted equally and positively.
  3. Family friendliness. To measure if an area is a good place for families, which is 30% of our total score, we looked at the percentage of married couples with at least one child under age 18, and the percentage of families in poverty with at least one child under age 5. The percentage of families with at least one child was 70% of the score, while the percentage of families in poverty was 30% of the score.
  4. Educational quality. Using data from GreatSchools, every place was assigned a ranking from 1 to 10 for the quality of schools. Education is 20% of the total score.